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The Good Among the Great was a Boston Globe Bestseller for the week of May 22-29! It came in number 7 on the Nonfiction Paperback list, just below Malcolm Gladwell and tying with Anthony Bourdain. Thanks for your support! To order your own copy from Amazon, click here.





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Life Magazine recently featured Diana, Princess of Wales on the cover, in a morbid tribute to her 50th birthday—of course, if she had only lived. What struck me, besides the inappropriate attempt to make money from a lost icon, was the profound sadness of Diana in the picture; see below.

 

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Click here to watch author Donald Van de Mark reveal the secrets to success of those who’ve reached the top. The Good Among the Great.
KDKA CBS Pittsburgh, May 19, 2011.





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Click here to watch author Donald Van de Mark reveal the secrets to success of those who’ve reached the top. The Good Among the Great.
Boston Fox AM show, May 17, 2011.





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Click here for video and radio interviews of Donald Van de Mark discussing the 19 traits of the good among the great.





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Everyone is always wondering what makes some people simply happier than others.  I’ve learned over the years that there are a series of traits—yes, 19 specific traits—that help make one joyous as well as successful.  And  little by little psychologists, behavioral economists, social psychologists and even neuro-biologists are proving that to be true.

It’s even true on a national basis.  Go to this great piece by psychologist Robert A. Lavine in the Atlantic Monthly to see the reasons for the Danes’ elevated levels of happiness as a people. Continue Reading…





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“It really was an odd coincidence that a book about people who are happy and effective helps to counsel those who are potentially unhappy and paralyzed by their own unnecessary speed bumps or superficial external pressures. You have created something special and I am so grateful (for my own enjoyment) and happy for you that you tapped into a very potent topic that is so meaningful and helpful to your readers. Congratulations and thank you!”
Christina French, Publisher & Editor, Table Magazine





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Hollywood has produced a crop of hit movies about mind control.  Bob Mondello’s excellent April 15th piece on NPR’s All Things Considered, Movies That Mess with Your Mind, is a great review of four recent hits about struggling to control one’s mind and life:  Inception, The Adjustment Bureau, Limitless and Source Code.

The gist of each plot is that contemporary men and women are losing control of their very selves; and further, that there are insidious and pervasive others who control us. In our highly connected, media-soaked lives, it’s easy to think that this is a new phenomenon. It’s not.

The late great psychologist, Abraham Maslow, wrote that the vast majority of people “do not make up their own minds… They are pawns to be moved by others rather than self-moving, self-determining individuals. Therefore, they are apt to feel helpless, weak, and totally determined. They are prey for predators, flabby whiners rather than self-determining, responsible persons.”

Ouch! It’s bad enough that we’re “pawns to be moved by others,” but Maslow has to throw in that we’re “flabby whiners” too. (No wonder the hottest consumer product these days is the new girdle, Spanx.) Setting aside America’s weight problem, how is it that most of us are pawns, to be moved about by others?
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When I covered the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting in 1994 for CNN, I was given just two minutes to interview the Chairman and Vice Chairman, Warren Buffet and Charlie Munger. I used one of my precious questions to ask Munger if his decision “to violate his own rule to not sit on outside boards and sit on the board of directors of Costco [Wholesale Corporation] was an implicit endorsement of the stock?” He glared down at me through his extra thick glasses. (The room was so small that I had to crouch on the floor to stay out of the camera shot.)

Charlie was peeved not only because I was pointing out an inconsistency between his words and actions, but also because I was asking him to violate his and Warren’s rule against making stock predictions. After about five agonizing seconds, Charlie finally, honestly, begrudgingly, spat out “Yes.” Warren, who had turned to stare at Charlie’s discomfort, swung his head back to me and exclaimed with a big smile, “That’s more than I ever get out of him!”

Charlie’s innate honesty kept him from ducking a question that most powerful people would fudge or simply decline to answer. But fudging and ducking is not what Charlie and Warren do, especially Charlie. They’re fully integrated human beings so, as former U.S. senator Bill Bradley recommends, the externals of their lives truly reflect the internals. They do and say what’s truly on their minds. And because they’re fundamentally honest and expressive, what you see and hear is who they truly are.

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This is the first of a series of comments on David Brooks’ book.

David Brooks nails it with his new book,The Social Animal.  After looking at all the great research going on these days into human behavior, one of his core conclusions is that the emotional connections we make throughout life determine who we are, and who we can become.

Brooks cites several research studies about the importance of student-teacher connection when it comes to student achievement. One comment from a great interview on San Francisco’s KQED radio show, “Forum” with Michael Krasny: “I came across one researcher who said that if you want to know who is going to drop out of school, go into… when you go into a school and ask the kid, ‘Who’s your favorite teacher?,’ and if they give you an answer to that question, that kid will not drop out.  If they look at you as if that question is absurd then those kids are at risk.”

That human connection is even more important than grades and SAT scores.  It’s about self-determination, which is so critical to happiness and productivity.

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